The Employee Assistance Fund for Alaska Airlines Employees  provides assistance to employees in the event of an emergency or major medical situation, or those employees suffering a catastrophic loss. The EAF is to be considered an employee's last resort, after having exhausted sick leave, vacation time, and other avenues of assistance. The EAF does not assist in the event of a furlough, no overtime, make up for trades, extra trips normally worked, decrease in work hours, etc.
All applications received are confidential. Each is researched and voted upon by a Board of Directors consisting of volunteers representing every division of Alaska Airlines.

If approved, the EAF is here to help with critical household expenses and health insurance premiums. Generally, we are a one-time, short-term assistance, helping employees up to a maximum of 6 months. Exceptions may be determined by the Board of Directors.


All payments are made directly to the creditor.  We do not make payment on legal fees, luxury items or credit card debt nor do we give cash to employees. 


 If you have technical trouble with the Sign-in or Application process, contact:  kelly.mongrain@alaskaeaf.com


The Mission of The Employee Assistance Fund, as a non-profit organization, is to provide financial support to qualifying Alaska Airlines employees who need assistance due to catastrophic or medical reasons.

Horizon Air Employees have a separate employee assistance fund 

                                         
         



Upcoming Events

SPRING Online Auction: April 19 - May 3

The auction is currently accepting donations, please use this form and comail items to: EAF Auction SEAEA 
or drop off at Alaska Air Group Credit Union M-F 9-5 (19530 International Blvd S, Suite #108, Seatac, WA 98188). 
If your comail is going on an aircraft, contact Sundi Rees at sundi.rees@alaskaeaf.com for further instructions.

For any online auction questions, contact: sundi.rees@alaskaeaf.com
More Auction info: https://biddingforgood.com/aseaf

                         

The Stories
Teri McClain

Teri McClain, a Seattle CSA, was already going through a hard time when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in November of 2016 . She had recently lost her dad and shortly after having shoulder surgery, she discovered a lump while in the shower, like most people she was caught completely off guard. She had healthy habits such as drinking green tea, eating kale salads and steel cut oats. She doesn’t smoke or drink.

Over the ensuing months she had chemotherapy, followed by lumpectomy surgery and then radiation at Swedish Cancer Institute.

Through it all, she’s been off work and living on long-term disability. She's hoping to come back to work in a less physically demanding role.

McClain maintains a positive outlook and has thrown herself headlong into getting better and taking advantage of her time off work to develop other interests. Swedish offers many wellness programs such as yoga, art and music therapy. McClain participates in all of them, as well as being obsessive about nutrition and her physical recovery.

“The breast cancer part stinks, but it’s given me a chance to do more of what makes me happy. I have so much gratitude for all the little things now,” she said.

She’s also been very “out” with letting people know she has cancer – she shaved her head before starting chemo, wears a pink cap to keep her head warm and was featured in an article on Swedish’s web site about her journey. She has found comfort in telling people what she’s coping with and how she’s feeling.

“When you open up about breast cancer and put it out there, you become part of an amazing community. You help one another and get inspired,” she says.

McClain tentatively contacted the EAF, not sure if they would be able to help. She was quickly approved and a volunteer walked her through all the ways they could help – they paid her rent, utilities, phone and health insurance when it ran out.

"Now I get it. It goes to people who really need it, whether it's breast cancer or any other tough life event.  It takes the worry off so you can focus on your wellness," she said.

About Us

The Employee Assistance Fund was conceived in 1992 by Alaska Airlines Captain Al Brunelle. Al wanted to help fellow employees who may be suffering financial hardship due to a major medical or catastrophic event.

The Fund is not a part of the Alaska Airlines company or Air Group. It is a separate, non-profit organization made up of employees who volunteer to serve on the Board of Directors,
representing all divisions of Alaska Airlines.

The goal is for every Alaska Airlines employee to donate $5 per paycheck. All donations further the purposes of the Employee Assistance Fund in its programs and operations to assist Alaska Airlines employees. The EAF is a 501(c)3, charitable organization and all contributions are tax-deductible.

All employees are eligible to apply, whether or not they donate to the EAF. Applications are strictly confidential. Assistance granted is a gift, not a loan and is not required to be repaid.

Last year, about 25 percent of employees gave to the EAF through payroll deduction, which was used to help employees pay their mortgages, COBRA insurance, car payments and insurance, and medical and grocery bills while they recovered from injury or illness.

Besides payroll deductions, we have several fundraising events: EAF Online Spring and Fall Auctions, the Golf Tournament in Jul, and the Spring Online Sale in May. Many employees have also undertaken their own projects to raise money for the EAF, such as a piñata auction, charity hikes/swims/runs, book/bake sale, and pilot design study cards, to name a few; with all proceeds going directly to the EAF!
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